Material Support — Not For the Likes of Me

The other day friends and I were having lunch, when we got into a lively and heated discussion about state budgets, public pension funding and unions. Afterwards, we hugged and one friend said, “I’m glad we live in a country where we can talk about what we believe and nobody will throw us in jail!”

That’s probably true for us, white, flag-waving, not very political women with Protestant-sounding names.

What if your views don’t line up with the State Department’s?

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Sami Al-Airan. U of Florida professor and American citizen arrested in 2003, accused of material support of terrorists. He spent 28 months in solitary confinement, before he was tried before a grand jury, which acquitted him on the serious charges, and deadlocked on the minor charges. Al-Arian is still under house arrest and in legal limbo. Ironically, he campaigned for G.W. Bush in 2000 because of Bush’s opposition to the use of secret evidence. Image source.
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Jess Sundin. Anti-war activist and advocate for workers and civil rights in Columbia, the Gaza Strip and the West Bank. Her home was one of 9 in Minnesota and Chicago targeted in simultaneous raids in 2010. FBI agents searched her house in front of her 6 year old daughter, carted away “truckloads” of personal belongings. Sundin and the others subject to the raids refused to testify before a grand jury.  Image source

In 2010, in the case of Holder v. Humanitarian Law, the Supreme Court for the first time, ruled that free speech in the form of any kind of advocacy for a black-listed group, is a crime; that is, it is against the law to provide “material support” to any group that the State Department designates a terrorist organization. Material support includes humanitarian aid, advice, “services,” “political advocacy,” and “coordination.”  Suspected violators are subject to raids on their homes, “special administrative measures” which is a nice way of saying solitary confinement for indefinite periods of time without trial, time in a “super-max” prison or a notorious “communications management unit,” facilities designed to isolate  violent criminals.

Don’t worry if you’re a judge, T.V. commentator, wealthy businessman, former mayor of New York, former governor of New Jersey or former White House advisor. The rule doesn’t to apply to you.

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Rudy Guiliani, just to the left Maryam Rajavi, the woman in yellow. And look! John Bolton, 3rd to her right. This was taken at a rally to support the Iranian Mojahedin-e Khalq (MEK), a group the State Department designates a terrorist organization. Politicians, judges, scholars and TV commentators have accepted speaking fees from the group. Indictments and early morning raids forthcoming? Don’t bet on it. Image source.

If, however, you are an ordinary person who supports workers in Columbia, if you’re a Muslim, or if you send money to a Palestinian aid group, or speak out against wars in the Middle East, or publicly oppose NSA surveillance of your phone calls and e-mails, beware.

Here’s the story of former NSA computer program designer William Binney, when he  raised his head a little too far in protest of NSA surveillance.  

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